“Anxiety Disorder Case Study: Willy”Program Transcript WILLY: My name is Willy. I’m 35 years old. I’ve been divorced for five years and I don’t have any children. I am not seeing anyone at the momen

Home Blog  “Anxiety Disorder Case Study: Willy”Program Transcript WILLY: My name is Willy. I’m 35 years old. I’ve been divorced for five years and I don’t have any children. I am not seeing anyone at the momen

 “Anxiety Disorder Case Study: Willy”Program Transcript WILLY: My name is Willy. I’m 35 years old. I’ve been divorced for five years and I don’t have any children. I am not seeing anyone at the momen

“Anxiety Disorder Case Study: Willy”Program Transcript

WILLY: My name is Willy. I’m 35 years old. I’ve been divorced for five years and I don’t have any children. I am not seeing anyone at the moment.

My biggest problem is reliving events from my past. I joined the army when I was 18 years old. I love the structure of military life and the resources the army provided. I enjoyed the educational opportunities. And I also knew I would have a roof over my head and something to eat.

I was doing well in the military. So I stayed in for about 10 years. During that time, the US became involved in a number of foreign conflicts and initiatives. I was deployed to Afghanistan during one of my last years in the army.

In Afghanistan, my perspective on what I was accomplishing shifted dramatically. In one instance, I witnessed my best, most trusted friend shoot a young, unarmed girl just because she wore hijab. My fears after witnessing this event changed me forever. I became disenchanted with the army as I thought about all the people who were killed.

In the face of that girl, I saw my sister’s daughter, Heather. It seems now that every night I had dreams of war and genocide. Occasionally, during the worst times, I thought about whether it would have been better for me to have died in that country instead of returning to this miserable life. I wonder every day, if I had turned in my friend, would I not be haunted by this girl’s memory.

I panic at some point most days. I become agitated and lash out when my mind is on the past. It interferes with my work and my relationships with my coworkers. After I calm down, I tell myself that it doesn’t make sense for me to be panicking. But I know it will happen again. Sometimes, I’m afraid I might hurt someone if they startle me.

For this Discussion, view the media case studies titled Anxiety Disorder Case Study: Willy about Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Anxiety Disorder Case Study: June about Panic Disorder With Agoraphobia. Consider the uses and benefits of anxiolytic medications in the treatment of panic disorders, phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder, and social anxiety. Also, consider the general challenges in assessment, differential diagnosis, and use of psychopharmacological treatment for these conditions. In terms of addiction potential, recall how benzodiazepines mimic the effects of alcohol and other central nervous system depressants. Finally, consider the role of the counselor in terms of communication, including permission to contact a psychiatrist or physician or protecting the client from self-harm.

Post by Day 4 the challenges of treating the anxiety disorder of the client you selected. Then describe at least three potential anxiolytic medications that may be effective in treating this client and explain the potential addiction risk of each. Explain how this information might influence a counselor’s approach to counseling this client. Finally, explain the role of the counselor in communicating concerns to other health care professionals.

I posted the case study (PTSD)

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