How to change a single amino acid in a protein

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How to change a single amino acid in a protein

How is it possible for a change in a single amino acid in a protein of 1000 amino acids to destroy its function, even when that amino acid is far away from any binding site?

Explain the slow and fast ways proteins are regulated.

In the DNA of certain bacterial cells, 13% of the nucleotides are adenine. What are the percentages of the other nucleotides?
How many chromosomes are in haploid cells? Diploid cells?
The DNA in all the cells in our body aIDs up to about 100 TRILLION total meters of DNA. The sun is 150 billion meters from earth. So the DNA in our bodies could travel from the earth to the sun and back over 300 times. How does all this DNA fit in our cells and in our bodies? How is it organized? Explain how histone charge is critical for chromatin formation.
Eukaryotes and prokaryotes handle their RNA differently. Is this advantageous for eukaryotes? How? Is it also a disadvantage? (5′ cap, PolyA Tail, introns/exons, separation of transcription and translation spatially, advantage: splicing creates different functional proteins, disadvantage: introns make eukaryotic genomes very large, longer to replicate, bacteria can replicate in 20 minutes, human cells replicate in about a day)

 

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